Success?

Middle of September I wrote about putting 20 Phalaenopsis out on my balcony to experience cooler nights. With the exception of the night I brought them inside to avoid damage from Hurricane Fiona, they were out a total of 15 nights where temperates were below 15°C – my hope was this would encourage these dormant plants to sent up shoots.

Looks like I may have succeeded. I was watering the plants yesterday, looking closely to see if there was any sign of spikes, although not expecting results yet, only to discover four plants have started a flower spike. Fingers crossed more will show signs of flowering over the next months or so.

There are several with new leaves and there are new aerial roots beginning on some, but definitely four have the start of a flower spike. I’m quite delighted. I have no idea what colour these blooms will be but I’m happy with whatever shows up. This is a slow process – there won’t be flowers for at least a couple of months as the spikes develop. It’s fun watching the new growth come along.

Phalaenopsis

It’s that time of year when nights are cool, but not yet cold, to put your dormant phalaenopsis orchids outdoors so they can experience a noticeable nighttime temperature drop for a couple of weeks. The stuff I’ve read says the cool nighttime temperature (anywhere from 10-15/18 C) persuades the plants the season is changing and it’s time to flower again.

I have 20 dormant orchids – I placed them in two large tubs and put them out on my balcony five days ago. I missed this cool period last year and the temperature on my window ledge wasn’t cold enough so I had but a couple of spikes form. This year I think I’ve timed it right and, fingers crossed, I’m hoping for maybe 15 (could I be lucky and all will spike?) of the plants to create spikes. I plan on leaving them outdoors for at least two weeks (weather permitting and so far it’s looking promising).

The plants are healthy in spite of my benign neglect – however, I’m going to feed them judiciously as well as soon as I bring them in, in the hope that will further encourage them to bloom.

The process is slow – I don’t expect to see spikes until February/March.

Phalaenopsis In Bloom (last winter)

Wouldn’t it be nice if I were to get 5-8 blooms from each spike?

Here is some helpful info if you want to experiment with your orchids.